NHC downgrades 1969 Hurricane Camille

NHC downgrades 1969 Hurricane Camille
NHC
Weather Talk

POSTED: Sunday, March 30, 2014 - 5:46pm

UPDATED: Sunday, March 30, 2014 - 5:47pm

After re-analysis, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) downgraded Hurricane Camille's peak wind intensity from 190 mph to 175 mph, but increased the number of hours it spun as a tropical system.

"Based upon this reassessment, Hurricane Camille is indicated at landfall on the Mississippi coast to have been a Category 5 on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale with peak sustained winds of 175 mph and a central pressure of 900 mb," the report reads. "Camille is also reanalyzed to have undergone genesis as a tropical cyclone 18 hours earlier than first indicated on August 14, 1969."

Previous data showed Hurricane Camille as a Category 5 on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale, with winds of 190 mph and a central pressure of 909 mb.

Camille will remain categorized on the Saffir-Simpson scale as a Category 5 hurricane. However, it will no longer be ranked the number one, strongest hurricane in U.S. history. 

The 1935 Labor Day hurricane will be recognized as the strongest hurricane to strike the continental United States since 1900. It carried winds of 185 mph and a pressure of 892 mb. Hurricane Camille will be the second strongest. Hurricane Andrew in 1992 will be the third strongest, with winds of 165 mph and pressure of 922 mb.

To read the full report from the National Hurricane Center, click here.

 

Follow Meteorologist Kyle Myers on Facebook at www.facebook.com/weathermanmyers.

Comments News Comments

Post new Comment