Massacre of children leaves many asking, 'Where's God?'

Massacre of children leaves many asking, 'Where's God?'

POSTED: Saturday, December 15, 2012 - 1:30pm

UPDATED: Saturday, December 15, 2012 - 1:34pm

As he waited with parents who feared that their kids were among the 20 children killed at a Connecticut elementary school on Friday, Rabbi Shaul Praver said the main thing he could do for parents was to merely be present.

"It's a terrible thing, families waiting to find out if their children made it out alive," said Praver, who leads a synagogue in Newtown, Connecticut, and was among nine clergy gathered with parents at a firehouse near Sandy Hook Elementary School, where the shooting occurred.

"They're going to need a lot of help," Praver said of those who are close to the dead.

From the first moments after Friday's massacre, which also left six adults and the shooter dead, religious leaders were among the first people to whom worried and grieving families turned for help.

Over the weekend, countless more Americans will look to clergy as they struggle to process a tragedy in which so many of the victims were children.

"Every single person who is watching the news today is asking 'Where is God when this happens?'" says Max Lucado, a prominent Christian pastor and author based in San Antonio.

Lucado says that pastors everywhere will be scrapping their scheduled Sunday sermons to address the massacre.

"You have to address it -- you have to turn everything you had planned upside down on Friday because that's where people's hearts are," Lucado says.

"The challenge here is to avoid the extremes -- those who say there are easy answers and those who say there are no answers."

Indeed, many religious leaders on Friday stressed that the important thing is for clergy to support those who are suffering, not to rush into theological questions. A University of Connecticut professor on Friday hung up the phone when asked to discuss religious responses to suffering, saying, "This is an immense tragedy, and you want an academic speculating on the problem of evil?"

"There is no good answer at that time that anyone can hear and comprehend and take in," said Ian T. Douglas, the bishop for the Episcopal diocese of Connecticut, referring to counseling family and friends of the dead. "They're crying out from a place of deep pain."

Praver, the rabbi, will join a memorial service Friday night at Newtown's St. Rose of Lima Roman Catholic Church.

"We're going to have a moment of prayer for the victims," Praver said of the service. "We cannot let it crush our spirit and we march on."

Some national religious groups are also sending staff to Newtown, with 10 chaplains dispatched from the North Carolina-based Billy Graham Evangelistic Association on Friday.

Public officials including President Obama, meanwhile, turned to the Bible in responding to the shooting. "In the words of Scripture, 'heal the brokenhearted and bind up their wounds,' " Obama said from the White House, citing the book of Psalms.

On Twitter, #PrayForNewton became a trending topic.

Some religious leaders argue that modern American life insulates much of the nation from the kind of senseless death and suffering that plagues much of the world every day.

"Most of the world, for most of the world's history, has known tragedy and trauma in abundance," wrote Rob Brendle, a Colorado pastor, in a commentary for CNN's Belief Blog after this summer's deadly shooting in Aurora, Colorado, which left 12 dead.

"You don't get nearly the same consternation in Burundi or Burma, because suffering is normal to there," wrote Brendle, who pastored congregants after a deadly shooting at his church five years ago. "For us, though, God has become anesthetist-in-chief. To believe in him is to be excused from bad things."

Lucado said there was an eerie irony for the Connecticut tragedy coming just before Christmas, noting the Bible says that Jesus Christ's birth was followed by an order from King Herod to slay boys under 2 in the Roman city of Bethlehem.

"The Christmas story is that Jesus was born into a dark and impoverished world," Lucado says. "His survival was surrounded by violence. The real Christmas story was pretty rough."

Many religious leaders framed Friday's shooting as evidence for evil in the world and for human free will in the face of a sovereign God.

"The Bible tells us the human heart is 'wicked' and 'who can know it?'" the Rev. Franklin Graham said in a statement about the massacre. "My heart aches for the victims, their families and the entire community."

Many religious leaders also said that such tragedies are a good time for lay people to express doubts about God -- or anger.

"This is a time to go deep and pray," says Lucado. "If you have a problem with God, shake a fist or two at him. If he's God, he's going to answer. And if he's in control, he'll find a way to let you know.

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