Hospital Officials Stop Kidnapping Attempt

POSTED: Wednesday, October 14, 2009 - 10:20am

UPDATED: Thursday, June 3, 2010 - 11:58pm

A 25-year-old certified nursing assistant and mother of three is accused of trying to kidnap a newborn baby from the maternity floor of a hospital in western Oregon. Everyday at Samaritan Albany General Hospital patients and visitors come and go.

But one morning last month it was one visitor in particular who has the whole town talking. Captain Eric Carter with the Albany Police Department says on the morning of September 19th Trinity Vidal Hernandez walked into the emergency room and told the staff her friend was giving birth to *triplets on the side of a county road.

"About this time they're getting assets together in the emergency room to wait for this potential arrival of an emergency birth of triplets," said Carter. But in the middle of all the chaos the 25-year-old woman vanished and turned up on the maternity floor. "She was talking to another nurse, acquiring about a specific baby or somebody giving birth, something like that," Carter said.

Vidal Hernandez made it no further than the nurse's station but even then staff quickly called police who launched an investigation. "Everything points to she was going into the ward to take a child, again, we don't know what her plans were if she was successful in getting a child," Carter said.

We caught up with Vidal-Hernandez's dad outside of her Albany home. He told us there'd be no reason for his daughter to hatch a kidnapping plot. She has three kids of her own and two dozen nieces and nephews. "It's the last thing in my mind she'd do something like that, and there's no reason, there's absolutely no reason for her to do what they said she did," said her father.

But detectives say the plot was so secret, Vidal Hernandez went so far as to tell her own family she worked at Samaritan Albany General hospital, but in the end the plot to take a child from an unsuspecting mother was foiled by an alert staff. "Things happened, people got suspicious, called the right people and things turned out okay," said hospital CEO David Triebes.