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Calls work to convince voters they can cast ballot over the phone

POSTED: Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - 8:00am

UPDATED: Wednesday, October 24, 2012 - 8:02am

The dirty political tricks are really flying now that we're so close to Election Day.

One Cape Coral, Floria woman says she got a phone call designed to rob her of her vote.

"She told me I didn't have to go and vote on Election Day, I could vote then and there over the phone," said Noelle Bishop.

Bishop says the woman calling said she was with the Republican National Committee.

After Bishop questioned her, the conversation stopped and all that was heard was a dial tone.

"I got annoyed," she said.

Feeling this was a potential scheme in the making, Bishop used the *69 service to get the mystery caller's number and to call it back to get answers.

She didn't have any luck.

"Nothing, it doesn't accept incoming calls," Bishop explained.

Bishop passed along the information to Cape Coral Police and the Lee County Supervisor of Elections Sharon Harrington.

Harrington says this is a first for her.

"This is something new and different we really haven't seen this before," she said.

She says she believes it's another tactic meant to confuse voters. But when it comes to strange calls, it's pretty straightforward.

"If somebody calls and says, 'You can go ahead and vote,' do not do it," Harrington said.

There is no proof the RNC had anything to do with the call and Bishop wants to make sure other voters don't fall for it.

Election officials say other things to look out when it comes to election related calls - make sure the person on the other end announces what office their with.

If they don't, feel free to ask.

Experts say no personal information, like Social Security numbers should ever asked or given to a caller.

If you have any questions leading up to November 6, contact your local supervisor of elections.

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