Boston residents comfort each other in wake of Marathon attack

Boston residents comfort each other in wake of Marathon attack
News

POSTED: Wednesday, April 17, 2013 - 8:00am

UPDATED: Wednesday, April 17, 2013 - 8:04am

As police begin the second full day of investigation into the terror attack at the Boston Marathon, people in that city and around the world are remembering the victims.

Throughout the Boston area, an outpouring of sympathy and support for victims, as investigators vow to get justice for them and this city.

In Dorchester, Massachusetts Tuesday night, there was prayer and candlelight.

A show of support for an eight year old boy, Martin Richard, who died watching his dad run the Boston marathon.

His mother and sister are still recovering in local hospitals.

The boy's death is shaking this tight-knit community to its core. "It's just a terrible thing. Unbelievable, it just makes you sick and angry at the same time," said neighbor Austin Habersham.

Not far away, hundreds gathered on Boston Common, trying to make sense of the senseless, together, and honored the memories of the victims

Among them, 29-year old Krystle Campbell whose mother remembered her in front of their Medford home. "She had a heart of gold, always smiling. Couldn't ask for a better daughter," said Patty Campbell, Victim's Mother.

The third person who died in Monday's attack was a Boston University graduate student from China.

Investigators continue processing a 12-block crime scene - what one official called the most complex Boston police have ever seen.

The FBI displayed the first pictures of the devices used in Monday's attack.

Pressure cookers packed with gunpowder, nails and ball bearings likely carried in black nylon bags.

Leaders are urging the public to come forward with pictures, videos, and tips. "Whoever did this is a family member, brother sister; we're asking the public to call us; Someone knows who did this" Richard DesLauriers of the FBI.

The investigation is moving on as more than 70 recover in local hospitals from physical wounds, and a city and nation recovers from its emotional scars.

Chris Pollone, NBC News

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