Endangered cranes brought to La. to save species now slaughtered

Endangered cranes brought to La. to save species now slaughtered
All About Animals
Thursday, October 13, 2011 - 3:45pm

The whooping crane is the most endangered crane in the world with under 600 left in the world. Ten birds were introduced to the marshlands of Southwest Louisiana back in March, and now only five remain with one unaccounted for.

"They’re the world's most endangered crane," Carrie Salyers, Biologist Supervisor for the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, said.

Interrupted when a male and female whooping crane were, according to Wildlife and Fisheries agents, shot by two juveniles.

"Not to wear my heart on my sleeve, what you want to say is that this is a senseless act,” Salyer continued to say.

Carrie Salyers is the biologist supervisor for the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries at White Lake Wetlands Conservation area, where back in March, ten whooping cranes were released into the wild the first presence of the cranes since 1950 in Louisiana.

"Because of the rarity of this bird and the time and energy that it takes to raise these animals,” Salyers said. “Certainly it's disheartening how much time can be associated to getting them to such a good point to be released and how quickly they can be removed from the equation."

The cranes do not migrate, so they will stay in Louisiana permanently the flock is protected under state law and the migratory bird treaty act making any hunting on the bird illegal the death of the two birds puts a setback to bringing the whooping crane back into Louisiana.

"It's an emotional toll on all of us that are associated with this, not just of course the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries employees."
 

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